Digital Development and Evaluation – HUD Assignment

 

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

At the beginning of the digital creation of my HUD, I sought to pin down the visual language and style early. I experimented with the modified trapezium shape that I designed in my sketchbook, expanding upon it further. I then incorporated the LED strip around the edge, making use of strokes and shapes and a soft airbrush to create the glowing LED effect. To create the element, I used a pen tool to create the overall shape, added a stroke for the LEDs, copied the shape and enlarged that to create the rim. The segments were created using the line tool repeatedly.

 

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Once I had the main design direction down, I used the sketches in my sketchbook as reference as I began to create the HUD. I decided to have two main elements on the bottom part of the HUD, angled off as though they were jutting out of the HUD itself and wrapping around the viewer. The bottom middle section is more flat, located directly in the centre and below the drivers eyes. A similar process to that mentioned before was used to create these elements, with the side panels being skewed to create the extruding look.

Backing panels were created to keep the other panels from floating off, paired with the bright blue LEDs, allow the HUD to be readable on most backgrounds. The use of guides and the pen tool was integral in this process, allowing me to line up the various elements and ensure symmetry. The shapes, having been created with the pen tool, were able to be manipulated and changed as I designed. The bar at the top was created, once again, in a similar fashion to the other elements. This time I added in a battery charge bar, using more lines to create segments that would react and change colour depending on their charge. In order to create the look of glass covering the chargeing bar, which represents the current electrical charge of the car, I used the bevel effect, as well as manually designed highlights.

Once the main parts of the HUD were positioned, I began to incorporate the overlay. The analogous colours of blue and green harmonised nicely, standing out from one another yet unifying the design as a whole. This is further reinforced later on when I included green in other parts of the HUD, such as in the speedometer and the way finder/compass.

To create a more 3-dimensional look, I used the 3D Extrusion tool/option to manipulate the bottom panels. The extruded area, even when manipulated, did not fit in with the rest of the HUD. I then decided to manually incorporate 3D elements instead, using the line tool to create a vanishing point off the side of the canvas. I then used the pen tool to create sides to the panels.

Moving on from that, I further worked on the overlays. I included your current position and lap, using the TimeBurner font to do so. In order to create the glowing effect, which helped communicate the ‘overlay’ aspect, I used both the Outer Glow effect with the Lighten blending mode. I set the colour to a bright, saturated green and manipulated various sliders to create the desired effect.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

To create the track map, I traced over screenshots taken using Google Maps of London and other surrounding areas. To do so, I used the pen tool to create a series of nodes that I then manipulated using the Convert Anchor Point tool. This allowed me to create curves, more accurately tracing the roads. Once that was completed, I turned the path into a selection and added a stroke to it to create the track. I then took the traced track, on its own layer, and isolated it into another document. There, I placed it in a copy of one of the panels from the HUD. I then created a 3D extrusion, manipulating it in space. Once I was happy with the angle and level of extrusion, I used the gradient tool, opacity and eraser to hide and reveal different parts of the track, fading it into the display.

To add more information to the track map, I created a circle that I extruded in 3D to represent the player (green) and the other racers (red). To create the checkpoint/start/end point, I created a triangle using the shape tool. To ensure readability I added a grey stroke around the border. Afterwards, I created the chequered flag within a mask, using a series of black and white squares. Once completed, I placed that on a part of the track and copied over the layer group back into my HUD document.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Initially I had created a bar-based speedometer for the HUD, however, that design did not fit the overall direction and was distracting. Therefore, I decided to re-do the speedometer in a more modern, stylish way. I used the TimeBurner font to create a series of numbers representing speed in KM/H. I then created multiple divides, made using the line tool, between these numbers. Below the numbers themselves I created dots so that the positioning of the needle is more accurate and is able to be read more clearly. The needle itself was created using the pen tool and went through multiple iterations. I decided to go for a long, sleek look to the needle, the modernity being further reinforced by the contrasting glow and dark background. To create familiarity, I referenced real-life speedometers and included a base for the needle. With the needle being a digital representation, the base is more to create a grounded area that the eye can use to track the needle along, rather than actually house and operate the needle. It also provides a glow, spreading out from beneath it, helping to illuminate the surrounding area and tying in with the glow from other areas of the HUD.

To create the glow for the text, lines and dots, I used a similar process to the one I used for the overlay. The needle, instead of just having an Outer Glow, had an Inner Glow effect applied upon it as well. This furthered the glowing digital look that I was creating.

As I progressed with the HUD, especially after I added highlights to the panels and displays using bevels and gradients, I realised that the blue of the needle and numbers were being lost and confused due to the close proximity of the same blue colour.

Therefore, I changed the needle, numbers, lines and dots in the speedometer display to green. This created a much better visual impact and increased the readability without creating too much contrast. To change the colour, I added in the Colour Overlay effect and set it to green.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

The creation of the targeting overlay digitally was done with referencing the early sketches made in my sketchbook. The design itself is heavily inspired by the symbol of a battery when represented in an electric circuit. I used the varying lengths and contrasts of verticals and horizontals to inform my designs, creating a tiered overlay. At the centre of the targeting overlay, I have contrasted those verticals and horizontals by creating a diamond shape with a circle at the centre, mimicking a stylised eye. The lines themselves were created using the line tool with the help of the guides and rulers. The glow, once the overlay was put into the HUD, was created using the Outer Glow effect.

 

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

In order to create the way finder/compass, I had to extend the middle panel to accommodate the circular shape. The intention of this element is due show the player what direction they should be heading, as well as their orientation in the map. The compass itself will react to the direction that the player faces, spinning to hide and reveal parts of the circular digital display.

To create the way finder/compass, I had to extend the middle panel to accommodate the circular shape. The intention of this element is to show the player the direction they should be heading, as well as their orientation in the map. The compass itself will react to the direction that the player faces, spinning to hide and reveal parts of the circular digital display.

The TimeBurner font did not create the type of capital N that I needed to ensure readability for this element, so I instead tried out a few fonts before settling on Cordia New. Again, I added the relevant glow effects and colour overlays.

 

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

I experimented with several colour harmonies, although I did stick with the analogous blue and green. These colours were ones used by the Battery Conservationist team, which is the team this HUD is for.

During the process of creating the HUD, I regularly referenced real life dashboards, my research and analysis of other game’s HUDs and my sketchbook.

For the final HUD design, I added in a background to provide context. In order to create this, I used an image from Google Maps that I then manipulated and photo-bashed with the aid of several other photos. I masked out the sky and inserted an image of a starry night. I then used several photos of cities and long-exposure photographs of streets to build up the rest of the image. TO create the sky line I inserted several images, layering them on top of one another and integrating them by applying blending modes and erasing unnecessary parts. The healing brush tool helped with repairing areas where needed. To create the look of headlights, I used the gradient tool to lay in some blue light spilling out from in front of the player’s ‘car’.

I created several variations, with a solid bevel on one, a glass bevel on another and one with the isolated HUD.

hud-development-final-bevelhud-development-final-glass-bevelhud-development-final-isolated-hud

Compared to some of the more recent driving games that I researched and analysed, such as Forza Motorsport 6, my design is not as minimalist, however I believe that it works well in context. The brief was to create a HUD for a racing sim game that features electric concept cars. The Battery Conservationist’s logo and HUD complement each other nicely and fit into the context of the imaginary game level nicely. However, I could have made better use of the space by going for a more simplified and stylish approach, though that would not fit with the team’s identity.

I applied some of the lessons I learnt when analysing the HUDs from other racing sim games, such as the need to create an area for the player to see without being cluttered by too much useless information. The targeting overlay may appear slightly intrusive but it only appears when you are fully charged and are ready to use your vehicle’s special ability or weaponry.

Seeing as we were working in a computer room/classroom environment, we had to ensure safe working practices so that no harm befalls you, your peers or your teachers. Bags were kept out of the walkways, off the desks and no food or drink was consumed inside the room. This guaranteed that there are no tripping hazards and that no equipment is damaged.

 

Design development process (as mentioned in Task 1 Blog Post):

The design development process can be broken up into R.I.D.E., meaning Research, Ideation, Development and Evaluation. This is a tried and true method that helps provide a clearer roadmap, especially once planned, for projects and assignments.

The process is continuous, even though you may have ‘completed’ your research near the beginning of the project, more should still be done throughout the duration of the assignment. You should continuously be analysing and evaluating your designs, and once you have arrived at a more finished design or prototype, you must evaluate that before either moving onto finalisation or going back to the ideation and development phase.

 

 Images used for the photobashed background were found online and can be accessed here:

 

http://wallpaperswide.com/city_lights_2-wallpapers.html

 

http://hd-wall-papers.com/single/1383638-city-lights-wallpaper.html

 

http://more-sky.com/WDF-418396.html

 

Advertisements

Sketchbook Development and Evaluation – HUD Assignment

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

For my logos and HUD designs, I started off creating sketches in my sketchbook. I attempted to create three distinct yet connected design directions for the three different logos and teams, evolving the designs through multiple iterations. I experimented heavily with alterations and variations, trying out symmetrical and non-symmetrical layouts.

The designs evolved as I iterated, with the three different directions becoming clearer the more I worked. I not only experimented with the shapes, but also the values, testing out value hierarchies and making sure that the logos read well. For the Red Angels logo, I focused more on the contrast between round and angular, making use of values to further this juxtaposition. The arrangement of the circles and ‘wings’ were initially inspired by the position of a pilot or driver in the cockpit or seat of a vehicle. As I drew I realised that it resembled a radiation symbol, I then made use of that to help inform the designs, pushing the arrangements and proportions of the angular ‘wings’.

In regards to The Architects’ logo, I wanted to include an angular diamond shape that is reinforced by strong, structural verticals and horizontals. The diagonals helped create an overlapping division, allowing the two other elements to exist on a similar plane without interfering with one another. The use of angles and measurements helped greatly with accuracy in the drawings, allowing me to achieve symmetry in the designs.

The Battery Conservationists’ logo is visually similar to the Red Angles when it comes to the angled ‘wing’ designs bordering the centrepiece. The curves in this design, however, are reserved for the battery symbol in the centre. This simplified shape, representing a battery, provides clues as to the nature of the team. Experimentation was done regarding the overall design of this logo, with changes to the background rectangle, the placement and size of the battery and the nature of the ‘wings’. In some designs, they leaned more towards a battle-axe look, while others were more geometrical and triangular. The curved ones were experimented with extensively, negative and positive space being pushed and pulled throughout the iterations. Positive and negative symbols, and value separation regarding them, were experimented with for the battery part of the designs. However, I decided not to include any other symbols on it, to avoid clutter.

Once I was happy with the sketched options, I moved into Photoshop in order to create the finished logos. Research into colour combinations and harmonies was also done to ensure a visually pleasing final result.

After I was happy with the design of the logos, I moved onto the HUD designs. Continuing the theme of angular shapes, creating rough layouts of the overall HUD as well as the various elements within. The main shape language stemmed from a modified trapezium shape. To help create a border between the information within the HUD and the game world, I created thin borders around the main space of the shapes. Past that, I experimented with bevels and other borders of different values, ensuring that the HUD was visible while against a variety of backgrounds.

I planned for the top bar to display health or electrical charge, whilst the bottom displays would contain speedometers and track maps/mini-maps, as well as other information. For the electrical charge bar and speedometer, I was going in the direction of digital display with a bar that fills up, changing colour as it reaches a different amount of charge or speed. Multiple iterations were created of these various elements, as well as the overall shape language.

Experimentation was also conducted to find other ways to display the electrical charge, such as an overlay. This overlay, visually similar to that of a fighter pilots, would serve to display information that was not built into the car, but rather added as modifications for racing and are able to be updated for various situations. Instead of using it to display electrical charge, which I decided the top bar would do, I instead used it as a targeting overlay. I also used it as a way to show the player their lap number and position. To make sure that this stood out from the rest of the HUD, I flipped and altered the orientation of the shapes that housed the elements in the HUD, arranging them onto the sides of the top bar. To tie the targeting overlay in with the theme of electric concept cars, I researched the electrical symbol used for batteries and create multiple iterations of the targeting overlay based on that. I settled on a design direction that incorporated a series of lines of varying lengths, bordered by strong verticals with a diamond shape in the centre, contrasted by a circle within.

I needed to add more visual interest to the HUD, so I decided to make use of the thin borders around the various elements that I had designed to incorporate LED-like lights, neon in nature and broken up by thin lines to create a series of segments. With the direction leaning towards high contrast and futuristic digital displays, I re-worked the speedometer to include a more traditional approach, edited to create a more futuristic look. I used the visual language of the modified trapezium as a basis to create a speedometer, adding in repeating lines to represent the different speeds and placement of numbers. To further mimic real life speedometers, I included a needle. However, this needle exists separate from its elongated base, it is a digital representation that moves independently from it.

I experimented with different iterations for the needle, trying out thick and thin variations with different proportions. Alongside these iterations, I tried out different value combinations for the speedometer, seeing how the digital representations of the needle and lines would create patterns of light and dark. The digital shapes would cast off a slight glow, illuminating themselves on the dark background.

Design Sheets:

design-sheet-1design-sheet-2design-sheet-3